Climate Change: Sea to Trees at Acadia National Park

Schoodic Institute, Acadia National Park, and Earthwatch bring citizen scientist volunteers to Acadia National Park. Earthwatch works internationally, bringing individuals from all walks of life together with world-class scientists to work for the good of the planet.

Register to Volunteer on the Earthwatch Website

Things are changing in Acadia. How do we know?

For one thing, Acadia’s scientists have over 120 years of detailed natural history observations to compare current patterns to. And that’s where Earthwatch volunteers come in- to help collect similar data that can be compared to this extended time-series data-set. Few places in the country have such a rich pool of observations to draw from and make comparisons to. Earthwatch citizen scientists help scientists tell the story of how humans are reshaping Acadia, which they hope will inspire policies that will help safeguard this iconic American habitat.

2016 Earthwatch Team 8 during their stay at Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park

2015 Earthwatch Team 5 during their stay at Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park